Open House: Intangible Heritage Values for Vancouver’s Chinatown

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50 E Pender Street
Vancouver, B.C.

What does Vancouver’s Chinatown mean to you? What makes Vancouver’s Chinatown unique and special? Why is it important to you? What do you value about Vancouver’s Chinatown?These are some of the questions that Heritage BC will be asking the public at an open house on August 20, 2015 and through an online form on the Heritage BC website.

Heritage BC is conducting public meetings and gathering public input in August 2015 on behalf of the Province of BC’s Ministry of International Trade and the Legacy Initiatives Advisory Council (LIAC), to identify the intangible heritage values of Vancouver’s Chinatown.

Although there has been previous recognition of Vancouver’s Chinatown as a heritage site, and several studies conducted by the City of Vancouver concerning municipal planning and Vancouver’s Chinatown, there is fear that the intangible heritage and cultural values, those values difficult to define in terms of architecture and physical features alone, have not been clearly captured. Identifying the intangible heritage values of Vancouver’s Chinatown is an important step in ensuring that all the aspects of what makes Vancouver’s Chinatown special, unique, and culturally significant to the City of Vancouver, the province of British Columbia, and Canada as a whole, are not lost, but conserved, promoted and celebrated.

LIAC Co-Chair Professor Henry Yu expressed why this project is so important and timely, “Chinatown is undergoing many changes, and it is fundamentally important to understand what different and diverse people value about Chinatown, why it is unique and important to them, before these values are lost.”

The public open house takes place on August 20 between 2 pm and 6 pm at the Chinese Cultural Centre boardroom located at 50 E Pender Street in Vancouver. At the open house participants will be asked to think about Vancouver’s Chinatown in relations to different historical, social, and cultural themes and to identify what they value about Vancouver’s Chinatown.

“Anyone can provide input. There are no wrong answers and you don’t have to be a history or heritage expert to communicate what aspects of Chinatown’s story are important or significant and have contributed to its unique identity “ says Heritage BC Executive Director, Kathryn Molloy.

For those unable to attend the open house Heritage BC has an online form on its website to collect public input: The form will be available until August 28, 2015.

Heritage BC is a not-for-profit, charitable organization, and has worked with the Ministry of International Trade and LIAC on the nomination process and interactive map for the Chinese Historic Places Recognition Project.