5 money-saving tips for students

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Money tends to be tight for students who have to go to class while still managing bills, tuition and other assorted costs. From creating a career plan with the Blueprint Builder to avoiding late fees, here are a few tips to put money back in your pocket.

Pay everything on time, all the time

Image: GuySie

Image: GuySie

Paying your bills on time is smart and financially responsible. Why? Because late fees add up. It may just be a dollar here or there, but when totalled, those late fees can do serious damage to your budget and credit rating. Make it a habit to pay your bills on time. Not only will you save on late fees, you’ll also prevent yourself from overspending.

Take advantage of student discounts

Image: Cheryl Savan / Shutterstock

Image: Cheryl Savan / Shutterstock

For those in school, two of the best words in the English language are “student discount.” You can save money on dinners, movies, clothing and even big-ticket items, like computers and software. Depending on where you live, transit passes may cost less if you’re in a specialized program and items related to your industry might be offered at a reduced price. Get comfortable with asking businesses if they offer a student discount and reap the benefits.

Use student bank accounts

Image: Africa Studio / Shutterstock

Image: Africa Studio / Shutterstock

Restaurants and clothing stores aren’t the only places that offer discounts for students. Many financial institutions offer student bank accounts with lower fees (or no fees at all) for full-time students. Talk to someone at your financial institution to find out which type of account makes the most sense for you.

Plan your path and find your fit

Image: Monkey Business Images/Shutterstock

Image: Monkey Business Images/Shutterstock

Use WorkBC’s Blueprint Builder to find out the best program for you based on your interests and expertise. You can determine what school to go to, the best (and least costly) path to career success and even if your program has an apprenticeship option, so you can earn money while training. The Blueprint Builder also has job search resources so you can target jobs in your ideal location. Plus, many in-demand jobs may be eligible for certain grants, saving you even more money.

Sell your extra things

Image: Chekunov Aleksandr / Shutterstock

Image: Chekunov Aleksandr / Shutterstock

If you have items laying around that you no longer use, don’t be afraid to sell them. Some goods can be sold online or you can host a swap meet or garage sale with friends. College and university bookstores often buy back used textbooks; so if you don’t think you’ll need your Advanced History of the 20th Century textbook anymore, sell it. You won’t make a lot of money, but you might get enough to pay a bill or two.

The life of a student isn’t usually one of luxury, but by following a few simple tips, you can make sure you have a bit more money in the bank. For more information on the Blueprint Builder or to find other programs that will make your post-secondary experience a little easier on your wallet, visit www.workbc.ca/blueprintbuilder.

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