Summer Water Safety Tips 2014

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The coroners’ service says the dangers of drowning haven’t sunk in with many British Columbians, especially teenage males who believe they can swim out of danger even if they’ve been drinking alcohol.

A report released today by a B.C. Child Death Review Panel examines the drowning deaths of 35 young people and says that important water safety messages are not getting through to youths.

A Canadian Red Cross report examining water-related fatalities over 10 years revealed many common factors:

  • Young children ages 1 to 4 and men ages 15 to 44 are at the greatest risk of drowning.
  • Drowning is one of the leading causes of unintentional death for Canadian children ages one to four.
  • A small child can disappear in seconds and can drown in only a few centimetres of water-enough to cover the mouth and nose. Typically these drownings occur in backyard pools, toddler pools, the bathtub, or at the beach.
  • Small children are also the most vulnerable group for near drownings. For every death, there are an estimated four to five additional near-drowning incidents, which require hospitalization and often result in varying degrees of brain damage.
  • Infants and toddlers drowned mainly in bathtubs and pools, whereas older children and youth drowned mainly in large bodies of water.
  • Other factors for adults in water-related fatalities included current and alcohol consumption.

Summer Water Safety Tips

Active supervision

  • The absence of adult supervision is a factor in most child drownings.
  • Whether it’s a pool, the bathtub, a water park, or the beach, always watch children actively around water-even if they can swim.
  • Consider requiring all non-swimmers to wear a lifejacket to keep them at the surface to assist you while supervising.

Backyard pools

  • Backyard pools are especially dangerous for small children. Ensure adequate barriers are in place such as four-sided fencing along with a self-closing, self-latching gate.
  • Empty portable toddler pools after each use.

Bathing children

  • When bathing infants or toddlers, an adult should remain with the child at all times- children should never be relied upon to supervise other children in the bath.
  • When a child is in the bathtub, never leave to answer the phone or for any other momentary distraction.

Diving

  • Diving headfirst into water should be avoided unless the individual is properly trained and is sure that the water is deep enough.
  • Avoid diving in home pools and always enter the water feet-first.

Open water

  • Never underestimate the power of current. Swimmers or waders can be swept away in an instant, particularly if non-swimmers or weak swimmers get caught by current in rivers or out of their depth in abrupt drop-offs.
  • Be cautious about swimming in currents, and know what to do if caught in a current.

 

Source: Canadian Red Cross | Featured Image: Lifeguard giving CPR via Shutterstock

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